Best Article Of The Day

Brian Burke isn’t going to let up on Kevin Lowe anytime soon. He references “that contract” about as often as Richie MacLean discusses the current status of his 401k/RRSP. In any event, David Staples a writer out west is looking enviously at Mr. Burke and his recent fortunes in taking over the Maple Leafs. Here are a few snippets:

“One has to give credit to the cagey Burke for escaping a team that is already over the cap (Anahem is at $58 million thanks to Burke) and seizing control of a team that is well under the cap (credit to Cliff Fletcher). From his grave, Niccolo Machiavelli tips his hat to Burke, the master of fortuna (good luck) and skillful machinations. This year, Toronto’s cap number is $47 million, while Los Angeles is at $45 million. There’s room for both teams to pick up one or two stars.”

I have yet to hear anyone refer to Toronto as shopping for or being able to pick up stars…

“So don’t be surprised if you see an NHL superstar making his way to the Kings or the Leafs in coming months. And don’t be surprised if fans in the numerous cities that are right up against the cap — such as Edmonton, Chicago, New York, Ottawa, Philadelphia, San Jose, Pittsburgh, Washington, Anaheim, Calgary and Detroit — find themselves waking up and looking with great envy at Los Angeles, where Lombardi might soon be hailed as the smartest head in hockey for the way his team has recently shed salary, positioning itself perfectly for the the NHL’s coming fire sale.”

Surprised??? If it is the right guy we will be dancing in the streets!

I think the best thing Burke can do is hold. Next season doesn’t concern me as much as the season after. Burke would be wise to keep that cap space handy because teams who are at or over are going to be in trouble when the cap goes down in the season following next…

You can read the story and a classic photo you don’t want to miss here….

Advertisements

One response to “Best Article Of The Day

  1. He makes a great point.The salary cap has made talent almost a secondary consideration in making trades in the NBA.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s